Cosmic Allies Vol. I — KRCL-FM and Steve Williams

Jazz DJ Steve Williams speaks about the origins of KRCL-FM
Interview with Michael Evans at Nostalgia Coffee House July 2015

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(Left) Painted Mural at Nostalgia Coffee House; (Right) Photo of the Blue Mouse Theater and Cosmic Aeroplane circa 1980 — KRCL-FM’s first broadcast studio was behind the west upstairs window, digitally colored blue in the photo above. Note the address on Steve’s ID card below.

KRCL was very important to my radio career.

It was an exciting time for me and anyone involved — anyone who had an interest in a new radio station going on the air. I’d actually got my training on the equipment at KUER in 1979 — running a board shift. They were called “board shifts” for people who would run shows. Of course everyone up there at that time were volunteers. There were not many people paid — mostly students. So I learned how to “do the equipment” at KUER.

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But in that same few months of early ’79 is when Steve Holbrook called me (after speaking with musician Harold Carr) and said: “I hear you’re the Jazz guy. I’m starting a new radio station that we expect to go on the air at the end of the year, and would you like to be involved?” and I said “YES!”
“I’d like you to do a Jazz program on Saturday Night for me,” and I said “OK!”

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(Note from Michael — Steve Holbrook was a community activist turned politician.)
Here is a flyer from one of Holbrook’s political campaigns, circa 1972:

Candidate Holbrook (PDF File)

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Details from the article announcing future radio station KRCL-FM — courtesy of Steve Williams

Uncredited Newspaper article from mid-1979 announcing the future KRCL-FM (PDF File)

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I continued to do my board-op at KUER …
just to keep my experience up on the equipment, which was definitely an advantage!
Me and other guys like Smokey and Michael G. Kavanagh, and other people who had worked at radio stations before, had that same advantage of knowing the equipment — it helped out.

So we were meeting a couple of times a week, or one time a week, I can’t remember — here at the Blue Mouse, and we’d actually meet in the theater too.

Salt Lake Tribune article about KRCL’s debut from late 1979_(PDF File)

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When we went on the air in that early December …

I remember the place was still kind of messy. We were wondering if we were indeed going to be on the air, and the excitement of it all — like, a new station, and all that was overwhelming!
So the first Saturday Night — I think they went on the air like on a Tuesday, maybe mid-week, then I came up a few nights later.
Saturday night! … the night before, Friday night, I had come up to the station because I wanted to see somebody work the operation before me, and that someone was Michael G. Kavanagh, who I had known from the past.

mgk002cNote: Michael G. Kavanagh was an extraordinarily influential Disc Jockey in the Salt Lake radio scene — he was an engineer with a First Class FCC license, able to work late nights by himself on KCPX and KNAK during the height of the Sixties Rock Revolution. He also ran the board at KUER, KSXX, and KALL (Where he first played Jazz in the wee wee hours as “Iron Mike.”) He enjoyed a long productive career in a variety of roles in broadcasting before his retirement in the 21st Century.

So I came up and sat behind him during his Friday night show …

I was going to be on the NEXT NIGHT. This was the first Friday night of KRCL, and to watch him … The place, first of all, you had to step over piles of stuff just to get in where the board was, and to sit, so I sat behind him and watched him operate.

And to watch Michael G. Kavanagh with his act on the radio !!
He was actually back-queuing records on the air where you could hear “eh eh ahh ahh ah” and then he’d say “Well here goes …The Beatles … or somebody,” after he’d back-queued it on there.

I thought, “If he can do that kind of stuff, nobody’s going to get heavy on me for anything!” So it made me relax too. My program — they’d kinda came up with a name called City Jazz, and I liked Jazz City better, so I turned it around to Jazz City and I kind of named myself the Mayor of Jazz City.

Steve Williams — The Mayor of Jazz City — and that’s what I did for two years, that show. Got my act together and then in ’82 I was hired back at KUER to actually be paid to do the weekends. And that began my professional career, being paid, where I moved into being the director in ’84 and now retiring.

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(Left) Steve Williams speaking with Ramsey Lewis in Telluride, Colorado; (Right) Steve Williams, Mayor of Jazz City, representing KRCL-FM at the Telluride Festival in 1981.

KRCL was an exciting time, though.

It was all new and at the time there wasn’t a lot of what we called Free Form Radio at the time — not at KUER, I felt at the time, even though they had SOME Jazz programming and all that.

At KRCL, I could be myself amongst everybody who were all brand new. It wasn’t just me who was brand new, it was everybody, and I had the advantage of having that KUER experience as recently as days before. I was running a board, so I was prepared for the show I was about to embark on, and I did it for two years.

We had to rely on our own records of course, and Smokey would loan some out (from the Cosmic Aeroplane record shop) and we’d always “beg, borrow, or steal” whatever we could to have material to play. Smokey would let us borrow records – behind-the-counter records. He’d get upset if we didn’t get them back in time. I had a pretty good collection at the time myself – from my parents and my own and then what I could get – so it was always a struggle. It was once a week. I had to plan. I’d always take a lot in, so I’d have lots of choices.

It’s funny, when John Greene came onto KRCL they wanted to give him some kind of program – and they wanted him to do Saturday Night, so I moved to Sunday Night for my second year. John moved into management, too. (Note from Michael — Greene became Director at both KRCL and KUER, announcing his retirement from the latter in 2017.)

I was the first to play ECM Records out of Europe – they had Keith Jarrett, a Norwegian sax player named Jan Garbarek, John Abercrombie, Ralph Towner, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago did an album for them. There was also the group Oregon.

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Examples of some artists and artwork on ECM Records.*

My last night at KRCL, I was planning on giving my C’est la Vie, because I was beginning the next weekend as an employee of KUER doing weekend Jazz there — Saturday AND Sunday nights. So my last Sunday Night at KRCL, we were knocked off the air because of a lightning storm hitting a tower – right in the middle of my program. Without a word about me going, “this is my last night,” or any of that kind of business. They were off the air for a few days in my case.

So the next weekend, I’m at KUER — both nights there. At KRCL these guys laugh about: “Hey Steve, we want you to come down and do your last night on KRCL – Do your Grande Finale down here!”

KRCL started off with really great intentions. It was a great place to get my act together. Under those circumstances, I was free to explore my own reality there, and what I could create with my music!

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Memorabilia from Telluride and the Jazz Festival in 1981 — Courtesy of Steve Williams.

About meetings, equipment, and KRCL staff members:

You know, I enjoyed it. I liked the KRCL crew. There was a comradery about it, Michael — that we were all new in it, and it was exciting!

My show was followed by four seventeen year olds, they alternated. One of them was Mike Anderson, so I groomed him from that “kids show” more or less to do some Jazz programming.

Holbrook was around quite a bit in those days. Another woman was around too, Marti Niman, a program director. I remember meeting (talk radio host) Joe Redburn, who had a show at KRCL. Wes Bowen had a (talk radio) show like Redburn’s on KSL too, when he was Public Affairs Director. He also had a Jazz show.

Lewis (Downey) was one of our early engineers at KRCL, as I recall, and when he came to KUER, we’d worked with each other before.

We brought in other people – John Schellinger was a friend, he did an earlier program. He was a Jazz lover! Perry Shepard was another guy. We’d gone through some program directors like Bob Flores, Steve Holbrook, a woman named Sunny – she’s the one who issued me my KRCL I.D. card so I could go to the festival in Telluride and represent KRCL.

As we decided in our programs, as we eliminated and came up with the actual programming grid for the week. We had meetings at the beginning about who would end up with a program, I recall – there were more people than those who got programs at those meetings. I remember meetings we had when we were deciding on a festival.

(Note from Michael — After they moved their studios to 8th South, KRCL promoted a well-attended Day in the Park festival at Liberty Park for two decades.)

I was already gone when they moved to Eighth South. When I was at KUER, as jazz director and host, I also helped set up the Salt Lake Jazz Society’s Canyon Jam. For Snowbird Blues and Jazz Festivals, I helped with the choice of groups and MC’d every festival for nineteen years!

I was told by Wes Bowen – I know this ‘cause I saw the equipment:
The equipment was all donated to KRCL by KSL, and Bowen told me that this was easier than KSL having to air other viewpoints on issues. They allowed KRCL to go on the air, with alternative views, with their equipment — it all had KSL written on the back.

(Note from Michael — Steve Holbrook sued KSL after they refused his request for a rebuttal about the Viet Nam War after explicitly soliciting “responsible” contrary opinions. KRCL-FM eventually came into being out of the lawsuit.)

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Oh, Brad (Collins) was a character, ‘cause I’d known his dad. His dad was such an influence you know with Jazz music – Al “Jazzbo” Collins. Brad came honestly through his interest in music. My parents were friends of his dad and mom and when I was a kid, they moved from Salt Lake to someplace – we went over as a family and bought a whole bunch of these records of his with his little logo on them – the Jazzbo Collins logo. (See cartoon below.) It was a good time.

(Left) Al

(Left) Al “Jazzbo” Collins as he was drawn in Mad Magazine* by Wallace Wood circa 1964; (Right) Brad Collins, as drawn in his store by a yet-unnamed artist.

You know, Brad was breaking the barriers with his type of music – that was my beginning of hearing Punk music back then. And here’s the first Punk Guy, whose dad was the Early Jazz Guy. He has his personality, so of course we were friends, and he loves Jazz too – he grew up with it.

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As far as genres went, there were people who wanted certain kinds of music and would ask for that – Doc Floor (of Zion Tribe) and David Santavasi; I remember (Blue Mouse Manager/Reggae DJ) Michael Hatsis being on the air; Native American Music — Donna Land (Maldonado) was with us early. She put in a lot of time!

We wanted to represent a lot of different kinds of musics and cultures – ethnic cultures, people who were under-represented. This valley can be a real wasteland sometimes, and still is, if you ask me.

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Photographs Copyright 2015 by Michael Evans

(Above Right) Steve Williams introducing the venerable Preservation Hall Jazz Band from New Orleans at the State Room in June 2015; (Above Left) Steve Williams addresses a crowd of several hundred well-wishers outdoors at the Gallivan Center in Downtown Salt Lake City on Thursday June 25, 2015 — the night before his retirement/final Jazz show on KUER-FM.

Utah’s KUER dropping Jazz … by Scott B. Pierce, Salt Lake Tribune Feb. 2, 2015

Williams also introduced the Corey Christiansen Quartet and Jazz legend Joe McQueen outdoors at the Gallivan Center. Williams is holding a special plaque in the leftmost photo above, engraved with an appreciation from his myriads of fans. He acknowledged Michael G. Kavanagh and Brad Collins, who were both sitting in the audience.

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Williams continued to MC for live musical events during “Jazz Nights” on Thursdays inside Downtown Salt Lake’s Gallivan Center.

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MC Steve Williams at Excellence In The Community‘s weekly concert upstairs at Gallivan Hall — photo by M.E.

He also supported fine Jazz players and composers in the local music scene:

The Ebb and Flow of Jazz by Katherine Pioli (2015)
Thanks to Catalyst Magazine for this link!
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“Jazz Time With Steve Williams” started broadcasting October 18, 2015 —
6pm to 10pm every Sunday Night on KCPW 88.3 FM in Salt Lake City.

Roger McDonough, Communications Director and Producer, with Station Manager Lauren Corlucci, encouraged Steve Williams back on the air.

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Autumn 2015 — Steve Williams running the board at KCPW (Photo by Roger McDonough.)

After an absence of only a few months, high quality Jazz rings out again over the radio throughout KCPWs listening area — and on the Internet. “New Jazz Archive,” a historical Jazz program, precedes Steve Williams’ spot.

kcpw001Link to KCPW FM

The community reacted positively to hearing Jazz on their radios again, indicated by articles in contemporary periodicals.

Utah Stories, reported:
“We’d been hearing from people in the community they wanted jazz back on the air and Steve was the obvious choice …”

Catalyst Magazine. quoted this on page 23:
“Having Jazz at the turn of a dial … created a whole new generation of Jazz lovers. It was the best way for a new listener … to have casual introduction to a uniquely American art form.

Among other things, the City Weekly‘s Best of 2015 issue said:

“Best return of daddy-o” Steve Williams on KCPW
Longtime radio host Steve “Daddy-O” Williams only thought he retired from broadcasting when he departed KUER 90.1 in June 2015. He even went on an European cruise, just like real retired folks do. Upon his return, however …

The Salt Lake Tribune reported: Steve Williams is bringing jazz back to the Salt Lake City radio dial …”  by Sean Means, September 29, 2015.

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Link to KCPW’s Program page for “Jazz Time with Steve Williams”

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KCPW-FM broadcasted the First Anniversary of Jazz Time with Steve Williams on October 16, 2016 —

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Steve Williams in the Denkers Studio on Library Square, Salt Lake City Utah playing Craig Larson’s “Mr. Williams’ Opus (Blues for Steve)” at the conclusion of his First Anniversary show for KCPW-FM.

KCPW 88.3 FM is a listener-supported non-profit. Thanks to all the listeners who contributed to their new and improved transmitter, which reaches a much wider range of Wasatch Front communities in 2017. The station can always utilize additional contributions from the Jazz-loving public to improve its services —
Link to KCPW’s website.

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(Answers to the question of when he’ll ever finish his last broadcast for KRCL 90.9 FM are totally “up in the air” — read the whole story above.)

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‘Jazz Time with Steve Williams’ started broadcasting throughout Utah in 2016.

Starting December 4, 2016, Utah Public Radio began carrying  ‘Jazz Time’ on Sundays from 6pm to 10pm — Link to the announcement on Utah Public Radio’s website.

Utah Public Radio also transmits KCPW’s “Behind the Headlines,” and has  FM Translators and Full Power Stations throughout the state, and even in Idaho — Link to UPR Stations

Read UPR’s descriptive brochure as a scalable PDF —

UPR_Brochure (PDF)

Enlargement of UPR’s map, showing the coverage of its network —

UPR_Coverage Map (PDF)

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Steve Williams continues to be MC for an increasing amount of live shows as Salt Lake’s Jazz Scene expands its venues:

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(Above) Steve Williams introduced the Salt Lake Sax Summit and Alex Boye on Wednesday Sept. 21, 2016 at the new upscale Eccles Theater on Main Street in Salt Lake City. (Below) 3rd Tier view of the Eccles Theater itself during Grand Opening Weekend.

The Jazz Scene continues to expand around Salt Lake during 2017 — at the Unitarian Church near the University of Utah; The Garage On Beck Street; Gracie’s on West Temple; Bourbon House below Walker Center on Second South;Twist on Exchange Place; Club 90 off South State Street; The Bayou on North State Street; Sugar House Coffee on 1100 East near 2100 South; and Hatch Chocolate Factory between D and E Streets on 8th Avenue.
Steve is usually the MC at free concerts every Thursday night in the Gallivan Center between Main and State Streets on Second South, and on Tuesdays in the summer, sponsored by Excellence In The Community. Steve is also regular MC for Jazz Concerts from the GAM Foundation, usually presented at the venerable Capitol Theater, home of Ballet and Opera, on Second South between Main Street and West Temple.

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One More KRCL Connection:

Roger McDonough, the producer and engineer for “Jazz Time with Steve Williams,”  also started his career in Radio at KRCL-FM.

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(L) Molly McDonough and (R) Roger McDonough in KRCL’s studios on 8th South.

Read Rogers article from the Deseret News circa 1990 in PDF form:

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Many thanks to Steve Williams for his contributions of personal memories and memorabilia. (Additional  information in parentheses is from Michael Evans.) The photo of Michael G. Kavanagh (circa 1967) and Steve Holbrook’s campaign flyer (circa 1972) exist courtesy of Becky Roberts, Steve Jones, and Charley Hafen. The graphic images of Brad Collins and Al “Jazzbo” Collins were supplied by former Cosmic Aeroplane staffer Dave Faggioli. Additional thanks to Roger McDonough on many levels.
*Portions of copyrighted material used above are for informational and historical purposes — protected uses under International Law. Media links used with permission from Salt Lake Tribune, Utah Stories, City Weekly, and Catalyst Magazine.
Graphic processing and photo captions by Michael Evans.

We continue to actively request contributions of pictures, memorabilia, oral histories, and needed corrections, concerning the Cosmic Aeroplane, Blue Mouse, and KRCL-FM — please contact our Blogmeister: mike_evans_exile@yahoo.com

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About Michael Evans

Michael has lived in Montana, Washington State (East and West), Holland, and England, but he was born in Salt Lake City, and graduated from the University of Utah.
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3 Responses to Cosmic Allies Vol. I — KRCL-FM and Steve Williams

  1. Steve where is Michael G. Now? Where is Steven Holbrook NOW, and all that Jazz?

    • I had to ask around, but Steve Holbrook is living on the Avenues and writing Letters to the Editor when something needs to be said. Michael G. retired from Radio — I saw him for a moment last year.

  2. Jeffrey M. Stone says:

    Steve, I miss our many regular coffee get-togethers at 1:00 am, after your show at KUER ended at mid-night. I also miss your jazz group, The Daddy-Os, in which we played jazz together in a 5-piece band, notably every Sunday eve., outdoors, in the summers of the late 1980’s, at Hymie’s coffee shop and restaurant, in the Ivy Place Mall. Great days! Glad you’re still on the air Sunday eves.
    “~Jeff-O” (your nickname for me.)

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